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The Write Software: Formatting

You can skip this part if you don’t plan on publishing your work. Who are we kidding? Of course you want to publish your own work!

Multipurpose or Workhorse Software

A lot of creative writing software like Scrivener and come fully loaded with word processing, outlining, and formatting features. Either way, even with the help of software and applications, formatting can be the worst.

I personally still format my own work using word. It’s a tedious process but well worth the effort to learn how. That doesn’t mean I don’t occasionally take the easy route. I almost exclusively publish my eBooks with KDP so for simple time saving I generally use the Amazon Formatting Programs.

Kindle Create

It’s Free! Kindle Create is perfect for people who don’t want to deal with all the fuss and have opted to go with Amazon as their sole distributor. All you have to do is open the application, import you word document or PDF and follow the simple on screen instructions. Of course, you still need to make sure everything lines up the way you want but its a simple and easy way to play with different styles for your eBook and print books. Once you are done you save it as a KDP file and upload directly to Amazon. The only downside to this is that since it saves as an Amazon specific file you will still need to figure out how to format your book for distribution on other sites.

Kindle Create Add-in for Word

It’s still in its beta testing phase but I’m not trying for anything too fancy. It’s simple and easy to format a decent eBook for kindle. At the moment it doesn’t work well for a paperback.

Check out this short video from Amazon KDP to see if this option is for you

Like I mentioned in The Write Process: Formatting there are lots of templates and services for formatting your novel online. With a little trial and error you can find what works best for you. If you have any suggestions or methods for formatting your work, feel free to comment below!

The Write Process: Formatting

Hurray! You’ve completed your manuscript and its run the gammut of editing. Now it’s time to format for publishing.

I am going to be honest. Formatting your manuscript for print can be a total pain. Formatting isn’t just an issue for self-published authors. A poorly formatted manuscript will quickly get your work rejected by agents and traditional publishers alike.

Formatting for Traditional Publishing

Thankfully, manuscript formatting is fairly straight forward. Most writing software already has a manuscript template or setting that cuts down on your work immensely. Still, it’s good to know what the guidelines are in case you need to format on your own. The following is a screenshot of a template for Microsoft Word.

The title page should include your name and contact information, number of words in your manuscript, as well as the obvious title and by line.

Headers should have the author’s last name, the title of the book, and page number.

The Body of the manuscript requires a little more work. If you have chapter titles, include them instead of the basic Chapter One. There should be one-inch margins and double spacing between lines. Text should be Times New Roman with 12pt font. Some Agents and publishers may require slightly different settings or additional content, but these are the basics.

Formatting for Self-Publishing

This is where things get more complicated. Most people skip this part altogether and rely on a formatting program or pay a professional to do it for them. How you format your self published novel depends on your genre and personal style.

There are some template available online, most of them are for word. How you format your self-published work also depends on what publishing platform you decide to use, and if you are publishing an Ebook or Print Book. Sites like Ingram Spark, Draft2Digital, Amazon KDP, and LuLu all provide either a template of guidelines for submission.

If you plan to publish with Amazon, the process isn’t as bad. Amazon provides users with a free formatting app, Kindle Create, for ebooks that simplifies the process immensely. While the app says it works for print as well, having personally used it, I cannot confirm that claim. Hopefully, there will be a way in the future as this is still in Beta testing. Below is a screenshot of Kindle Create using the word file from the manuscript template shown above.

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